Ongoing Research Projects

Ongoing Research Projects

Research at the LKY School addresses real-world policy challenges and explores and advances theoretical concepts across four broad areas: Policy Studies, Public Management and Governance; Social Policy; International Relations and Global Governance; and Economic Development and Competitiveness.

Our research is supported by a variety of sources, including highly competitive external grants from local and international funders.

Economic Development and Competitiveness

Academics in this cluster focus of specific areas such as Economic growth, role of ICT, International Trade, Finance and Investment, Regional Economic Integration and Fiscal Sustainability with particular focus on Asia.

Grant Period : May 2018 to Apr 2020

Faculty : WU, Alfred Muluan

A body of literature emphasises the existence of strong and positive nexus between different dimensions of financial sector liberalisation and economic growth, particularly in emerging market and developing economies. Although the growth effects of financial liberalisation have been well­discussed in the literature, the relationship between different dimensions of financial development (at a granular level) and macroeconomic and financial stability remains largely unexplored in the literature.
Ever since the global financial crisis, there has been a greater recognition that, beyond the conventional macroeconomic goals, policymakers need to be sensitive to financial stability concerns that could have macroeconomic repercussions. Does greater financial sector development help achieve enhanced financial stability? This is an especially important question in the context of emerging and developing economies in the Asian region that have varying degrees of financial sector development and continue to face challenges in e managing their economies in the face of volatile capital flows.
This project aims to contribute to the literature by undertaking an empirical analysis on a series of questions pertaining to the impacts of financial sector development with macroeconomic and financial stability in emerging Asia.

Grant Period : Mar 2017 to Mar 2019

Faculty : CHEN Jie, Yvonne

The main aim of this study is to present a distinctly different perspective to the management of the boom – bust scenarios that are associated with mining in resource rich countries. This is primarily the identification of the failure in the national income accounting system to account for the changes in wealth that unfold as the depletion of mineral stocks proceeds. for instance, when a country exports a certain quantum of minerals, the export revenue is usually counted in GDP and then taken as a measure of wealth. However, this revenue is also the value of the stock has gotten depleted and hence if the depreciation of the mine has to be accounted for. When such recognition is offered to the depreciation of the mine, there would be a clear revision of economic performance and the effect of the boom would indeed be moderated. therefore, we wish to argue that there is a need to revise the national income accounting system at a global level.

Grant Period : Sep 2017 to Aug 2020

Faculty : ZHENG, Huanhuan

Chinese outward FDI (ODI) has grown substantially especially after global financial crisis as its multinational enterprises (MNEs) explore investment opportunities abroad aggressively. the shortage on ODI data however leave many qualitatively important questions under explored. This proposal utilizes the newly available data on transaction-level ODI in global market to understand the determinants and consequences of Chinese ODI. We examines the synergies of policy coordination that bundle ODI with trade, credit in directing Chinese ODI and overcoming cross-border investment barriers. We evaluates how the practices of Chinese ODI boost the global competiveness of its MNEs and affect the investment and economic growth in home and host country.

Grant Period : Apr 2018 to Mar 2021

Faculty : RAJAN, Ramkishen S.

A body of literature emphasises the existence of strong and positive nexus between different dimensions of financial sector liberalisation and economic growth, particularly in emerging market and developing economies. Although the growth effects of financial liberalisation have been well­discussed in the literature, the relationship between different dimensions of financial development (at a granular level) and macroeconomic and financial stability remains largely unexplored in the literature.
Ever since the global financial crisis, there has been a greater recognition that, beyond the conventional macroeconomic goals, policymakers need to be sensitive to financial stability concerns that could have macroeconomic repercussions. Does greater financial sector development help achieve enhanced financial stability? This is an especially important question in the context of emerging and developing economies in the Asian region that have varying degrees of financial sector development and continue to face challenges in e managing their economies in the face of volatile capital flows.
This project aims to contribute to the literature by undertaking an empirical analysis on a series of questions pertaining to the impacts of financial sector development with macroeconomic and financial stability in emerging Asia.

Grant Period : Apr 2018 to Sep 2019

Faculty : VU, Minh Khuong

The economics literature has extensively examined the determinants of economic growth and development, of which institutional quality is found to be a primary driver (see: North, 1990a, 1990b; Acemoglu et al., 2003, 2005; Acemoglu and Robinson, 2012; Rodrik et al., 2004). Numerous indicators of institutional quality - including property rights, rule of law, policy consistency, and control of co1TUption, among others - have been empirically shown as robust detenninants of economic growth and the level of income.
This research examines the strategic choices of governments as a critical factor in institutional buildings and economic development, particularly as they relate to global economic integration, infrastructure development, and embracing the JCT revolution. the main focus of this study is to evidence that making sound strategic choices is essential for a developing country overcome its limitations in weak institutions and set a right path for its endeavors to promote economic development and institutional upgrading"