Share
Lunchtime Talk

Global Impact of China's Growth Slowdown and Structural Change

China’s sustained rapid growth prior to the global financial crisis greatly benefited the global economy. Both developed and developing countries gained from China’s healthy appetite for a wide range of goods and services. For example, Germany and Japan exported lots of machines and capital goods, while Latin American countries exported lots of commodities and materials. However, since the global crisis, China’s growth has slowed down visibly, along with the rest of the world. The slowdown has given rise to concerns and fears that just as China’s robust growth lifted the global economy, its recent deceleration will drag down global growth. ADB research performed for the Asian Development Outlook 2016 attempts to quantify the effect of China’s slowdown on the growth of different regions of the world. As expected, the impact will be most pronounced for East Asian economies, which are China’s closest trading and economic partners. Furthermore, the magnitude of the impact will depend on the magnitude of China’s slowdown. ADB research also delves into a related issue that receives less attention than the effect of China’s slowdown, namely the effect of China’s structural change. The evidence suggests that economies that can best adapt to China’s structural change can mitigate the negative effect of China’s slower growth.
Seminar Room 3-5,
Manasseh Meyer,
Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy,
469E Bukit Timah Road,
Singapore 259772
Wed 10 August 2016
12:00 PM - 01:10 PM

Dr. Donghyun Park

Dr. Donghyun Park

Principal Economist, Asian Development Bank

More about speaker

Prof. Chen Kang

Prof. Chen Kang

Director (MPAM and Chinese Executive Education); Professor, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy

Seats are limited and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Kindly register your interest in attending.

Please note that by clicking on the registration link above, you will be directly forwarded to a 3rd party independent site, which is not developed nor maintained by NUS. The website could be subject to data protection and privacy practices and you are encouraged to examine them before proceeding to share your personal data. NUS will collect, use and/or disclose the personal data submitted through this 3rd party independent site for the purpose of scheduling, processing, administration and/or management of the event. Please note that photography, audio and video recording may occur during this event. All photography, audio and video recording may be used by the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and the National University of Singapore for education, marketing, promotional and/or publication purposes. If you do not wish to have your image recorded or published, for compelling and legitimate grounds relating to your particular situation, please inform our staff.