Environment and Sustainable Development |

Environment and Sustainable Development

  1. How Singapore Took On Climate Change

    Author/s:
    TARA THEAN
    Year:
    2017
    Abstract:

    As the issue of climate change became increasingly politicized and controversial worldwide, Singapore made several commitments to playing its part in the global effort to reduce carbon emissions. In 2015, Singapore made official its target to reduce the country's greenhouse gas emissions per Singapore dollar GDP by 36 percent from 2005 levels by around 2030. This case study discusses the measures Singapore took to achieve this target as well as the concerns, considerations, and priorities that accompanied these measures.

    Read more

  2. Ramping Up Recycling in Singapore

    Author/s:
    TARA THEAN
    Year:
    2016
    Abstract:

    In 2014, the Singapore government introduced an ambitious vision: for the country to work towards becoming a "Zero Waste Nation". With Singapore's only landfill predicted to reach full capacity around 2035, the National Environment Agency (NEA) faced the task of reducing the country's waste disposal needs through the practice of the 3Rs — reduce, reuse, recycle — and incinerating all remaining incinerable waste to reduce waste volume and landfill needs. Though incineration was straightforward, getting the public to practise the 3Rs was not. Domestic recycling was far from a widespread practice in the country. Though the agency had introduced the National Recycling Programme in 2001, providing recycling services to HDBs, landed properties, and some private condominiums, it had been a challenge to make recycling a social norm in Singaporean society. Recycling was an active endeavour that required individuals to invest extra effort into getting ri d of the ir trash, and the act brought few immediate or visible benefits to any one person. Furthermore, the public gains of recycling competed for attention with more immediate concerns, like convenience and economic growth. "It's very difficult to get people to recycle as a way of life," NEA Waste and Resource Management Department Deputy Director Vincent Teo said. It was unclear whether public education campaigns were sufficient for inculcating values that would truly incentivize the public to recycle, or whether a tougher stance was necessary. The NEA had to decide what to focus on to shift public behavioural norms and inculcate the personal values that would lead to more recycling in Singapore.

    Read more

  3. Policy exercise: Urban water security under climate uncertainty – Lessons from Singapore and implications for ‘smart cities’ design in India (with Teaching Note)

    Author/s:
    SREEJA NAIR
    Year:
    2016
    Abstract:

    Changes in key climatic variables such as rainfall and temperature and the occurrence of extreme events such as floods challenge the sustainability of urban systems, massive economic investments and well-being of urban populations and settlements. Cities such as Singapore are increasingly being considered as a benchmark to design smart cities in Asia and address their urbanization goals and challenges. In this context, a policy brief needs to be prepared for the Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India, highlighting aspects of urban water security under climate change and its implications for megacities such as Mumbai and capturing lessons from Singapore’s urban development experience and water resource management practices.

    Read more

  4. The Dirty Business of Sand: Sand Dredging in Cambodia

    Author/s:
    FAZLIN ABDULLAH and GOH ANN TAT
    Year:
    2011
    Abstract:

    Global Witness, an international NGO, released its “Shifting Sand” report on sand-dredging in Cambodia in May 2010. The report highlighted the damage sand-dredging was causing to the livelihoods of local fishermen as well as the environment in the Koh Kong Province and alleged corrupt practices in the granting of licences. The sand was being exported to Singapore. Cambodia needed to sell its natural resources in order to develop and had attempted measures to protect its natural resources, however, the report showed that these efforts had not been very effective. The relationship between the Cambodian government and Global Witness had become strained due to earlier confrontations and the Cambodian government rejected the claims made in the latest report. The report, though, had generated interest among the international media and the team at Global Witness needed to define a strategy that would be most effective in stopping the sand dredging given the socio-political climate and the various resources it could mobilize from the government, public, media and development aid agencies.

    First Prize – Case Writing Competition 2011

    Read more

  5. The Proposed Cross Island Line in Singapore: Nature or Development?

    Author/s:
    KRISHNAN CHANDRAMOHAN
    Year:
    2014
    Abstract:

    The 50-km long Cross Island Line proposed by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) is a vital cog in Singapore’s ambitious effort to double the existing national rail network by 2030. It also runs through the central catchment nature reserve (CCNR). Apart from the four reservoirs, the CCNR also holds a wide variety of fauna, including the fragments of the last primary forests in Singapore and flora, which includes endangered species such as the banded leaf monkey. The case brings forth the tension between environmental conservation and urban development in a land constrained city/state.

    Read more

  6. Transboundary Haze: How Might the Singapore Government Minimise its Occurrence?

    Author/s:
    ALISHA GILL and TAN SHIN BIN
    Year:
    2014
    Abstract:

    Singapore is no stranger to the haze. Transboundary haze, caused by the burning of forests and peat lands in Kalimantan and Sumatra, has been a sporadic problem in Southeast Asia since 1985. It was labelled “the most serious problem in the region” by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) following the long and severe 1997-98 haze episode. The perennial haze raises several questions. First, given the large economic loss caused by the fires and haze, why is there a lack of robust responses to the problem? Despite expert claims that the haze is a complex but manageable problem, it has proven to be remarkably intractable for several decades. What is it about ASEAN and, in particular, Indonesia that make effective remedies elusive? Second, given Indonesia and ASEAN’s political peculiarities, should Singaporean policymakers muster a more effective unilateral response to mitigate haze? If so, what form should this response take? This case will address these questions by first considering the causes of the haze, the measures that have been taken to mitigate haze, and the reasons they have fallen short. It concludes by considering if the Singapore government should act unilaterally to mitigate the fires and haze problem and, if so, how it should go about doing it.

    Read more

WordPress Video Lightbox Plugin