Op-Eds and Interviews |

Op-Eds and Interviews

  1. Op-EdsThe rise of Asia’s middle class

    The rise of Asia’s middle class
    Writer(s):

    Kishore Mahbubani

    Date:
    Friday, 15 November 2013
    Synopsis:

    The explosion of Asia’s middle class is stunning. The size of this group currently stands at 500 million and will mushroom to 1.75 billion by 2020 – more than a threefold increase in just seven years.

    The world has never seen anything like this before. And it’s little wonder that people all across Asia expect a bright future for their children – according to Pew data, a massive 82% of Chinese respondents expect today’s children to grow up to be better off financially than their parents.

    The reason for this is that these Asian societies have begun to implement important reforms: free-market economics; mastery of science and technology; a culture of pragmatism; meritocracy; a culture of peace; the rule of law; plus, of course, education.

  2. Op-EdsWhat India and China can take away from Singapore’s water story

    What India and China can take away from Singapore’s water story
    Writer(s):

    Peter Brabeck-Letmathe and Asit K Biswas

    Date:
    Wednesday, 13 November 2013
    Synopsis:

    Water will be an important critical-resource issue for the social and economic development of the world in this century. Increasing demand for water and poor management practices over decades have already caused significant damage to the environment and the long-term development prospects of most countries.

    Take India. The country’s pollution watchdog noted last month that water from half of the its 445 rivers is unfit for human consumption because nearly all major Indian cities discharge domestic wastewater, mostly without treatment.

  3. InterviewsNeed for China to further deepen reforms

    Need for China to further deepen reforms
    Date:
    Tuesday, 12 November 2013
    Synopsis:

    Associate Professor Tan Khee Giap, co-director for the Asia Competitiveness Institute at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, had a phone interview with a CCTV English programme on the needs for China to further deepen its reforms.

  4. Op-EdsSeven pillars of Singapore's soft power

    Seven pillars of Singapore's soft power
    Writer(s):

    Kishore Mahbubani

    Date:
    Saturday, 09 November 2013
    Synopsis:

    Can Shanghai learn anything from Singapore’s softpower?

    This was the question posed to me for my opening keynote address for the Shanghai Mayor ’s International Business Leadership Advisory Council (Iblac) meeting in Shanghai on Oct 27.

    I was tempted to go to the podium and say: “Nothing”. It would have been my shortest speech ever. However, on deeper reflection, I realised that even though Shanghai’s population is almost five times that of Singapore, it might learn a lesson or two from Singapore’s experience. I therefore gave a speech on the s even pillars of Singapore’s softpower. It was well- received by the mayor and Iblac. Hence I thought it might be worth sharing it with my fellow Singaporeans in the hope that it will generate a robust discussion and produce a more authoritative list of the key pillars of Singapore’s softpower.

  5. Op-EdsChina, India and the emerging markets slowdown

    China, India and the emerging markets slowdown
    Writer(s):

    Razeen Sally

    Date:
    Friday, 01 November 2013
    Synopsis:

    China and India are in the vanguard of a historic ‘shift to the East’. While economies in the West shrunk during the global financial crisis (GFC) and remained in a funk afterwards, China, India and other emerging markets bounded ahead. But then the global economic slowdown hit them as well.

    India has seen a dramatic fall in growth, China a more gradual, milder decline. This has exposed deep fault-lines in both countries. Is the shift to the East still happening? And where will it go from here?

  6. Op-EdsSmart cities? The truly great have soul

    Smart cities? The truly great have soul
    Writer(s):

    Asit K Biswas

    Date:
    Monday, 28 October 2013
    Synopsis:

    City planning has always been difficult and controversial. In the 1940s, the Swiss engineer and art historian Sigfried Giedion warned that the instincts of the ruling class would restructure a city with the help of the technical elite, which could make it soulless.

    In 1937, the distinguished American urban planner Lewis Mumford warned that housing and city planners “had no clear notion of the social functions of the city”. His view was: “The city fosters art and is art; the city creates the theatre and is the theatre”. It is in the city that “man’s most purposive activities are focused, and work out, through conflicting and cooperating personalities, events, groups, into more significant culminations.”

  7. InterviewsSingapore makes an impact in world cinema

    Singapore makes an impact in world cinema
    Date:
    Monday, 28 October 2013
    Synopsis:

    As the founding Chair of the Asian Film Archive, Associate Professor Kenneth Paul Tan, also Vice Dean (Academic Affairs), was recently interviewed in a BBC programme by Tom Brooks on Singapore's film scenes. 

  8. Op-EdsHealth care: What Brazil, Thailand are doing right

    Health care: What Brazil, Thailand are doing right
    Writer(s):

    Tikki Pang

    Date:
    Thursday, 24 October 2013
    Synopsis:

    JEREMY Lim's book Myth Or Magic, is a lucid, highly readable, frank and balanced treatise on the Singapore health-care system. In it, he devotes 10 pages to a discussion of an important issue: What lessons does the Singapore experience offer to the world?

    This is an important question. But it is also important to turn the question on its head and ask: What lessons can the world offer Singapore?

    This is an important issue because, in addition to the current state of the Singapore health system, Dr Lim is very concerned about future challenges.

  9. Op-EdsEurope not quite the paradigm of peace

    Europe not quite the paradigm of peace
    Writer(s):

    Heng Yee Kuang

    Date:
    Wednesday, 23 October 2013
    Synopsis:

    WILL he or won't he? The guessing game over whether Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will visit Tokyo's Yasukuni Shrine has once again underlined what is often portrayed as Japan's lack of contrition for its wartime history. Germany's reconciliation with its European neighbours, on the other hand, is often presented as an example of how things should be.

    Many claims about how Europe has overcome its past demons, however, are true only in relative rather than absolute terms. When compared to Asia, Europe has achieved far higher levels of reconciliation between age-old enemies. Today, war between Britain, France and Germany, for example, seems unthinkable. Yet, the continent still holds residual traces of its past that continue to rankle.

  10. Op-EdsCan Singapore 'electrify' the world?

    Can Singapore 'electrify' the world?
    Writer(s):

    Kishore Mahbubani

    Date:
    Saturday, 12 October 2013
    Synopsis:

    SINGAPORE’S great weakness is that it is an absurdly small nation. Paradoxically, one great strength of Singapore is that it is an absurdly small nation. Hence, Singapore can try things out on a national scale that few other nations can dream about.

    Let me suggest one such bold national project. Let Singapore become the first country in the world to have an all-electric fleet of vehicles: cars, trucks, taxis, buses, etc. Singapore can create a new chapter in world history by becoming the first country in the world not to have petrol-fuelled engines on the road. And why should Singapore do this? There will be at least three massive benefits from doing so.

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