Op-Eds and Interviews |

Op-Eds and Interviews

  1. Op-Eds2014: The year of Big Ideas

    2014: The year of Big Ideas
    Writer(s):

    Kishore Mahbubani

    Date:
    Saturday, 11 January 2014
    Synopsis:

    This year will be a transitional year in the history of Singapore. It will be a year of major preparations for the massive celebrations we will have in 2015 to mark the 50th anniversary of Singapore’s independence.

    Several major events have already been pencilled into the calendar for next year. We will host the SEA Games, with many events taking place in the spectacular new stadium in Kallang.

    The National Art Gallery is also set to open in 2015 and a team of Singaporeans will begin scaling Mount Everest to commemorate Singapore’s 50th anniversary. The year will also see the first Singaporean fly into outer space, symbolising the fact that the sky is the limit in the future aspirations for Singapore.

  2. Op-EdsWhen small may be the new large

    When small may be the new large
    Writer(s):

    Kris Hartley

    Date:
    Saturday, 11 January 2014
    Synopsis:

    In cultural planning, the shock and awe approach is not always better. Developing more intimate spaces can help create a vibrant local economy.

    Culture is on South Korea's economic development agenda. In a recent meeting with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, President Park Geunhye expressed her support for an economy driven by innovation and creativity. PM Lee in turn acknowledged that "flourishing cultural and personal happiness" will accompany these emerging shifts in South Korea's economy and society.

    The transition to a knowledge economy is occupying the efforts of politicians and economists in Western countries, where manufacturing is already declining. The economic engines of these countries broadshouldered industrial cities such as Pittsburgh and Manchester have for decades been confronting the reality of global economic change. In many cities, creative industries represent one of the few remaining growth opportunities, generating a new wave of urban development focusing on cultural facilities.

  3. Op-EdsSingapore must ease ‘bandwidth tax’ on the poor

    Singapore must ease ‘bandwidth tax’ on the poor
    Writer(s):

    Donald Low

    Date:
    Wednesday, 08 January 2014
    Synopsis:

    The debate on poverty in Singapore has tended to focus on how much help the Government —and society at large — should extend to the poor.

    Advocates for doing more argue that given Singapore’s prosperity and its claims to be a first-world country, the little that the Government spends on welfare, compared with other developed economies, is unconscionable.

    The Government, however, contends there is no shortage of help schemes for the poor. In November last year, Minister for Social and Family Development Chan Chun Sing defended Singapore’s kueh lapis approach for helping low-income Singaporeans as being more targeted and flexible in meeting their needs than a single poverty line. Poor households need only to apply for the various social assistance programmes that subsidise housing, childcare, healthcare and eldercare.

  4. InterviewsWhat the future is like for our youth

    What the future is like for our youth
    Date:
    Monday, 06 January 2014
    Synopsis:

    In an interview with The Independent Singapore, academic Donald Low peers into the looking glass and sees some significant challenges for our youths.

  5. InterviewsHow will China counter Japan’s challenge?

    How will China counter Japan’s challenge?
    Date:
    Monday, 06 January 2014
    Synopsis:

    An interview with Huang Jing: How will China counter Japan’s challenge?

  6. Op-EdsHow to Prevent a War Between China and Japan

    How to Prevent a War Between China and Japan
    Writer(s):

    Kishore Mahbubani

    Date:
    Monday, 30 December 2013
    Synopsis:

    China and Japan, Asia’s two most powerful nations, are increasingly jousting in the skies and in the seas near a set of disputed islands. Although their economies remain deeply intertwined, relations between the two governments seem locked in an irreversible, dangerous downward spiral.

    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe further embittered feelings last week by visiting the controversial Yasukuni shrine, which honors the souls of Japan’s war dead, including 14 World War II leaders convicted as Class-A war criminals.

    Needless to say, neither side seems terribly interested in a rapprochement. That’s a shame, because the deterioration in ties is fairly recent, stemming from a single incident involving the islands administered by Japan, which calls them the Senkakus, and claimed by China, which refers to them as the Diaoyu. A single, symbolic-but-generous gesture could well halt the slide.

  7. 专访从水资源领域看新加坡的生态文明制度

    从水资源领域看新加坡的生态文明制度
    Date:
    Saturday, 21 December 2013
    Synopsis:

    新华网新加坡频道12月21日电(记者 陈济朋)新加坡负责水利水务的公用事业局20日宣布,新加坡将招标建设第三座新生水厂。新华网记者为此专访了新加坡国立大学李光耀公共政策学院副教授顾清扬,就新加坡的水资源制度、水资源管理等问题进行了充分交流。

  8. Op-EdsImagine all the people

    Imagine all the people
    Writer(s):

    Kanti Bajpai

    Date:
    Saturday, 14 December 2013
    Synopsis:

    "Re-imagining India", published recently by McKinsey, has 63 essays and scores of suggestions on "unlocking the potential of Asia's next superpower". The list of prescriptions is impressive, but what are the biggest challenges confronting India? At least four things are vital if we are to re-boot India.

  9. Op-EdsWealth management for all seasons?

    Wealth management for all seasons?
    Writer(s):

    Woo Jun Jie & Yvonne Guo

    Date:
    Tuesday, 03 December 2013
    Synopsis:

    According to World Economic Forum rankings, Switzerland is the most competitive economy in the world, while Singapore is a close second.

    This mirrors Deloitte's Wealth Management Centre Ranking, which ranks Switzerland as the most competitive wealth management centre in the world, with Singapore taking second place.

    With Asian financial centres such as Singapore and Hong Kong fast catching up with established wealth management centres such as Switzerland and London, analysts are quick to point out that this reflects a shift in the balance of global economic power from West to East. However, this overly simplistic view obfuscates the real story behind Asia's rising wealth management centres.

  10. Op-EdsThe rise of Asia’s middle class

    The rise of Asia’s middle class
    Writer(s):

    Kishore Mahbubani

    Date:
    Friday, 15 November 2013
    Synopsis:

    The explosion of Asia’s middle class is stunning. The size of this group currently stands at 500 million and will mushroom to 1.75 billion by 2020 – more than a threefold increase in just seven years.

    The world has never seen anything like this before. And it’s little wonder that people all across Asia expect a bright future for their children – according to Pew data, a massive 82% of Chinese respondents expect today’s children to grow up to be better off financially than their parents.

    The reason for this is that these Asian societies have begun to implement important reforms: free-market economics; mastery of science and technology; a culture of pragmatism; meritocracy; a culture of peace; the rule of law; plus, of course, education.

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