Journal Articles

  1. Resilience in practice: Five principles to enable societies to cope with extreme weather events

    Resilience in practice: Five principles to enable societies to cope with extreme weather events
    Publisher:
    Elsevier
    Author/s:
    Karin de Bruijn, Joost Buurman, Marjolein Mens, Ruben Dahm, Frans Klijn
    Year:
    2017
    Publication:
    Environmental Science & Policy
    Excerpt:

    The concept of resilience is used by many in different ways: as a scientific concept, as a guiding principle, as inspirational ‘buzzword’, or as a means to become more sustainable. Next to the academic debate on meaning and notions of resilience, the concept has been widely adopted and interpreted in policy contexts, particularly related to climate change and extreme weather events. In addition to having a positive connotation, resilience may cover aspects that are missed in common disaster risk management approaches. Although the precise definition of resilience may remain subject of discussion, the views on what is important to consider in the management of extreme weather events do not differ significantly. Therefore, this paper identifies the key implications of resilience thinking for the management of extreme weather events and translates these into five practical principles for policy making.

  2. Comparative analysis of water rights entitlements in India and China

    Comparative analysis of water rights entitlements in India and China
    Publisher:
    IWA Publishing
    Author/s:
    Shaofeng Jia, Yuanyuan Sun, Jesper Svensson, Maitreyee Mukherjee
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Water Policy
    Excerpt:

    Water rights are widely regarded as a crucial component to enhance efficient water use and for meeting a country's water resource challenges. This article presents a framework for analyzing and comparing the similarities as well as differences of the water rights systems between India and China. The article relies on the method of document research and comparative analysis to compare general characteristics of India and China's water rights systems based on six evaluation indicators and evaluation principles. Using this analytical framework, this paper compares the implementation effects of the water rights systems in terms of the degree of meeting water resources demand, conflict-resolution means and the protection of water resources. Our findings provide insights for the reformation of the water rights systems and bring out lessons that other developing countries can learn from India and China's experiences.

  3. Combating river pollution in China and India: Policy measures and governance challenges

    Combating river pollution in China and India: Policy measures and governance challenges
    Publisher:
    IWA Publishing
    Author/s:
    Yahua Wang, Maitreyee Mukherjee, Dan Wu, Xun Wu
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Water Policy
    Excerpt:

    Severe water pollution is among the top policy priorities in both China and India. This paper undertakes a comparative case analysis to examine efforts in combating river pollution in two major rivers in China and India – the Yangtze and the Ganga. Our analysis suggests that efforts in combating river pollution in the two Asian giants have encountered significant challenges, such as the lack of comprehensive legal mechanisms to control river pollution at the basin level, the lack of coordination among multiple government agencies, and significant gaps in policy implementation. Our analysis also points out significant differences between China and India in institutional structure, regulatory approaches and policy instruments to address river pollution.

  4. Water governance in China and India: Comparison of water law, policy, and administration

    Water governance in China and India: Comparison of water law, policy, and administration
    Publisher:
    IWA Publishing
    Author/s:
    Eduardo Araral, Shivani Ratra
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Water Policy
    Excerpt:

    We compare water governance between China and India in terms of water laws, policies and administration based on a survey of 182 water experts from 19 provinces/states. We find that water governance in China is consistently stronger compared with India across 17 indicators of water governance. We speculate that these variations could be attributed to differences in political, legal and administrative systems as well as levels of economic development and political system.

  5. Topsoil delivery to Himalayan rivers: The importance of sampling time

    Topsoil delivery to Himalayan rivers: The importance of sampling time
    Publisher:
    John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Author/s:
    M. Nawaz, R. J. Wasson, R. Bhushan, N. Juyal, F. Sattar
    Excerpt:

    Estimates of the amount of topsoil in river sediments can help constrain sediment budgets on decadal time scales. The tracers 137Cs and 210Pb(ex) are used to determine the proportion of topsoil in river sediments in two Himalayan catchments, a relatively simple but effective method that could be used in many catchments in this complex mountain range for management purposes. Different results are reached, apparently depending upon antecedent conditions, with a large component of topsoil in river sediments likely to be the result of rainfall that erodes hillslopes by sheet and rill processes, does not mobilize or mix with other sources of sediment such as from landslides, and does not generate high river flows to transport the topsoil downstream. These results show that sampling of tracers in sedimentary archives is essential to provide time series of topsoil input to Himalayan rivers to account for high temporal variability. 

  6. Paleofloods records in Himalaya

    Paleofloods records in Himalaya
    Publisher:
    Elsevier
    Author/s:
    P. Srivastavaa, , , A. Kumara, S. Chaudharyb, N. Meenaa, Y.P. Sundriyalc, S. Rawata, N. Ranac, R.J. Perumala, P. Bishtc, D. Sharmac, R. Agnihotrid, D.S. Bagric, N. Juyale, R.J. Wassonf, A.D. Zieglerg
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Geomorphology
    Excerpt:

    We use paleoflood deposits to reconstruct a record of past floods for the Alaknanda-Mandakini Rivers (Garhwal Himalaya), the Indus River (Ladakh, NW Himalaya) and the Brahmaputra River (NE Himalaya). The deposits are characterized by sand-silt couplets, massive sand beds, and from debris flow sediment. The chronology of paleoflood deposits, established by Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C AMS dating techniques, indicates the following: (i) The Alaknanda-Mandakini Rivers experienced large floods during the wet and warm Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA); (ii) the Indus River experienced at least 14 large floods during the Holocene climatic optimum, when flood discharges were likely an order of magnitude higher than those of modern floods; and (iii) the Brahmaputra River experienced a megaflood between 8 and 6 ka. Magnetic susceptibility of flood sediments indicates that 10 out of 14 floods on the Indus River originated in the catchments draining the Ladakh Batholith, indicating the potential role of glacial lake outbursts (GLOFs) and/or landslide lake outbursts (LLOFs) in compounding flood magnitudes. Pollen recovered from debris flow deposits located in the headwaters of the Mandakini River showed the presence of warmth-loving trees and marshy taxa, thereby corroborating the finding that floods occurred during relatively warm periods. Collectively, our new data indicate that floods in the Himalaya largely occur during warm and wet climatic phases. Further, the evidence supports the notion that the Indian Summer Monsoon front may have penetrated into the Ladakh area during the Holocene climatic optimum.

  7. Infrastructure Development and the Economics of Cooperation in the Eastern Nile

    Infrastructure Development and the Economics of Cooperation in the Eastern Nile
    Publisher:
    Taylor & Francis
    Author/s:
    Jeuland, M.; X. Wu; D. Whittington
    Year:
    2017
    Publication:
    Water International
    Excerpt:

    This article employs a hydro-economic optimization model to analyze the effects of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the distribution and magnitude of benefits in the Eastern Nile. Scenarios are considered based on plausible institutional arrangements that span varying levels of cooperation, as well as changes in hydrological conditions (water availability). The results show that the dam can increase Ethiopia’s economic benefits by a factor of 5–6, without significantly affecting or compromising irrigation and hydropower production downstream. However, increasing GERD water storage during a drought could lead to high costs not only for Egypt and Sudan, but also for Ethiopia.

  8. Comparing Water Resources Management in China and India: Policy Design, Institutional Structure and Governance

    Comparing Water Resources Management in China and India: Policy Design, Institutional Structure and Governance
    Publisher:
    IWA Publishing
    Author/s:
    Eduardo Araral, Xun Wu
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Water Policy
    Excerpt:

    A comparative study of water governance between China and India not only provides opportunities for the two countries to draw lessons from each other, but also sheds light on similar challenges in water resources management in other developing countries. In addition, both China and India are key riparian countries in some of Asia's most important international river basins, and their approaches to water conflicts in these rivers have significant impacts not only on water security but also on regional stability. Finally, comparative water governance is a new and undeveloped field of study.

    This special volume introduces a Modified Institutional Analysis and Development Framework as a tool to facilitate more systematic, theoretical, and comparative approaches to water governance in the context of comparative study of China and India. It does so by specifying various dimensions of the institutional context and how they could explain variations in the performance of the water sector. The aim is to help advance the current theoretical and applied discourse on comparative water governance as a basis for improving water sector performance.

  9. The value of skills – Raising the socio-economic status of rural women in India

    The value of skills – Raising the socio-economic status of rural women in India
    Author/s:
    Yvonne Jie Chen, Namrata Chindarkar
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Development Policy Review
  10. Evaluating the Performance of Alternative Municipal Water Tariff Designs: Quantifying the Tradeoffs between Equity, Economic Efficiency, and Cost Recovery

    Evaluating the Performance of Alternative Municipal Water Tariff Designs: Quantifying the Tradeoffs between Equity, Economic Efficiency, and Cost Recovery
    Author/s:
    Celine Nauges & Dale Whittington
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    World Development
    Excerpt:

    The design of municipal water tariffs requires balancing multiple criteria such as financial self-sufficiency for the service provider, equity among customers, and economic efficiency for society. A modeling framework is developed for analysing how alternative municipal water tariff designs affect these three criteria.




  11. Impacts of droughts and floods in cities: policies and governance

    Impacts of droughts and floods in cities: policies and governance
    Publisher:
    Routledge
    Author/s:
    Martin Stavenhagen
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    International Journal of Water Resources Development
  12. Benchmark levels for the consumptive water footprint of crop production for different environmental conditions: a case study for winter wheat in China

    Benchmark levels for the consumptive water footprint of crop production for different environmental conditions: a case study for winter wheat in China
    Author/s:
    La Zhuo, Mesfin Mekonnen, Arjen Hoekstra
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences
  13. Water footprint and virtual water trade of Brazil

    Water footprint and virtual water trade of Brazil
    Author/s:
    Vicente de Paulo da Silva, Sonaly de Oliveira, Arjen Hoekstra, José Dantas Neto, João Hugo Campos, Célia Braga, Lincoln Eloi de Araújo, Danilo de Oliveira Aleixo, José Ivaldo de Brito, Márcio Dionísio de Souza, Romildo de Holanda
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Water
  14. A Multi Method Approach towards Assessing Urban Flood Patterns and Its Associated Vulnerabilities in Singapore

    A Multi Method Approach towards Assessing Urban Flood Patterns and Its Associated Vulnerabilities in Singapore
    Author/s:
    W.T.L. Chow, B.D. Cheong and B.H. Ho
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Advances in Meteorology
  15. Uncertainty, Ambiguity and Adaptive Flood Forecasting

    Uncertainty, Ambiguity and Adaptive Flood Forecasting
    Author/s:
    R.J. Wasson
    Year:
    2016
    Publication:
    Policy and Society